Pizza

August 27, 2007 at 9:54 am Leave a comment

Ahmad took all of us, his international extended family, to his brother’s house to sample the pizza. His brother and sister-in-law plan to move to a city east of here and open a pizza restaurant. Based on our taste-tests last night, seems like it should be a winner.

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Ahmad’s brother Juma has been restoring an old house not far from here. The house has a stone oven in the courtyard that works quite well for pizza. His wife Ghaida had already made the dough and the fillings. When we arrived, she brought them into the courtyard and put them on a table. Ghaida is fast and efficient. First she and Masayo, our Japanese housemate “daughter,” shaped balls of dough and set them aside to rise. Then she rolled them out, the small ones first, while Masayo and Magiko (our upstairs housemate) spread meat on some and red pepper paste on others to make lahmajun. When Masayo dropped out, I learned to make cheese pastries and lahmajun. Ghaida is a wonderful teacher.

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Ghaida’s daughter, 5 years old, tried to help with all the stages. When I commented that her daughter could help with the pizza restaurant, I was quite surprised by Ghaida’s adamant response. No, she insisted, her daughter would go to school!

I told Ghaida that my own daughter is 23, and she smiled. “I’m 25,” she said. “How old were you when you married?” I asked. Fifteen. Ghaida hadn’t been to school, and her new husband, ten years her senior, taught her to read and write. Her daughter will go to school.

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Both daughter Diana and son Hikmet (8) seemed quite attached to the French teacher who has been living in one of the rooms of the restored house. We also met his sister and her two friends, visiting Syria for three weeks from Paris.

After we ate too many cheese pastries and lahmajun, the pizzas were ready. They were the closest to American-style pizza we have eaten outside the US. No pepperoni.

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Entry filed under: Food, Syria, Women.

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